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20121217
20121217
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the business is in the mid-sized to smaller communities who have even fewer resources than the large cities, less expertise. if you take options off the table, it will be, well, what we've done for the last 40 years, and right now we have some real challenges. so any good manager is going to want to have a maximum number of options. allbee: you've got to have a serious conversation with your constituency about what it costs to deliver the service that you're required to deliver and to deliver the service that they want. paolicelli: and i think, ultimately, the responsibility is going to be down to the user of this commodity. it costs money to operate these systems. there's a need to continually invest in these systems. there's going to be new regulations. it's all going to cost money. allbee: for all practical purposes, people are going to have to pay about twice as much for these services as they currently do. because a lot of the pipe that went in, a lot of the plants that went in, went in with very sizable portions of federal grant money, mechanisms that are no longer in place. narrator:
in this country. we've done it in new york. this is the safest big city in the country. there are other large cities that are making real inroads against gun violence, but at the local level mayors and governors can't do it without leadership at the federal level, and, again, the passion and the comforting words from the president, they're important, but they're not nearly as important as the kind of leadership that he and congressman larson, his colleagues in congress, need to demonstrate now to get something done. >> congressman, before we go, i have to ask you, what factor do you think contributes the most to moving the ball forward on this? is it greater coverage in the media? is it more leadership from our politicians? what do you need to see to push for gun control reform in congress? >> well, clearly, clearly, it's all of the above, but most importantly, it's leadership from our elected officials. we are elected with a responsibility and a charge, and we have an obligation to speak out. if this were a terrorist attack and, frankly, i think these are domestic acts of terrorism. we would
up is a healthy one not just for the school district, but for the city at-large and for a point of reference, much of the monies that were spent last year were spent reconverting the horseman campus to continue to develop the former bryant campus for international high school. to redo the isa campus and to finish building the brand-new tech 21 career building at the john o'connell campus. so there is a lot of really exciting projects that this work has funded and next year we have a number of similar projects targeted including trying to replace the final remaining modular what's buildings that we are renting with permanent classroom buildings. so with that, i would ask if there have any questions that you might have and hopefully you will approve the report. thank you. >> thank you; there are no public speakers for this item. any comments from the board or superintendents? >> no, but i read it. >> it's right here. >> i move the recommendations. >> we already did. roll call, please. >> have i one question? >> commissioner? >> thank you president yee. this report is an
are no or low cost but others like caa have large potential costs to the city and we didn't do that analysis. >> there is financial considerations. there is political considerations, and so if we have a document -- if we go to the next lafco meeting in january -- whenever it is. we will see the schedule later. it might be too quick to do that in a month and a different resolution for that, but i think that si process that is essential that we go to and provide a road map. >> and the last page in the report and lists the recommendations and near term, mid-term or long-term so the next two to three or three to seven or longer term so we started that work but certainly a lot more to do. >> i also have a question on the emphasis on pg&e and i am wondering if you could talk more about that. i am curious why there is equal treatment of clean power sf and pg&e since you have a program with clean power sf where the city has more control over it and i am wondering if you could talk about that, and by the way was pg&e on the task force? >> yes pg&e was a member of the task force and they did ask at
.7 acre feet for your water geeks. which covers the 9.4 irrigated acres that comprise over four city blocks of that large and iconic park. the alamo square project that we propose, this mou would cover anyway would cover this need within the park. the current system there we have a leaking irrigation system that is over 30 years old. more stunningingly we have a corroded coupler line, over 70 years old which far exceeds life cycle of that time. we have low water pressure in the park, which impacts our water distribution in the existing irrigation system. we have an inefficient irrigation system design and layout difficult to maintain lawn and steep slopes and underutilized areas. this is the actual need we have. in june of this year we were awarded by the puc the -- a grant in the amount of 1,318,485 to undertake this project, which requires the mou before you today. that particular project we have proposed would address these particular items. it would replace irrigation system. replace that completely quick cover line, install a booster pump to increase water pressure, improve irri
of this great country of ours, every region, small-town, large city, rural areas. but there is something that binds the americans together that i believe is unique among the nation's of the earth, and we are celebrating a part of that you need this today. and so, as we contemplate the future, let us remember that god has not given us the spirit of fear, but of power and of love and of a sound bite. thank you. -- and of a sound mind. thank you. >> thank you, governor strickland. i now ask for a motion to designate the secretary of state as the ex-officio official. >> i moved jon hustend be designated as the axle official secretary of the 53rd electoral college. bemoving that mr. husted designated. all those in favor by seeing aye. opposed? ayes have it. secretary, will you please return to the podium. we elect torrors are about to ct our votes for president of the united states. the procedures are set forth in the 12th amendment. separate of votes are to be taken for each of us on separate ballots. after the votes have been cast and counted and the results announced come electors will sig
liquor licenses. >> to that, in part, i would say that is a structural problem, and largely driven by our statutes. this governor is very pro- expansion of business. and in favor of things that make this city and state great. there is mileage from your local representatives on this. the governor is going to be supportive of whenever you want to do in the city of san francisco. -- what ever you want to do in the city of san francisco. >> i own a corner bar and i'm basically in the same boat. i am an entrepreneur and i want to open another bar and not got a lease in hand. i'm in danger of losing the lease because i cannot find a license. what i am wondering is, is it possible for that number -- i did not know we were saturated. is it possible for that number to change? can we control the market driven lics
the puc with that? >> i can and we have city attorney here who is also familiar with this and perhaps could fill in some of the gaps for me. the code of conduct largely came out of the -- the law that created the code of conduct requirement came out of the experience that pg&e and marin energy had when marin energy launched its program so the code of conduct puts certain restrictions on both parties, the utility, in our case pg&e and on us as a cca. broadly speaking it prohibits either party from misleading customers. it requires that any expenditures that pg&e incurs to actively market against the program cannot be reimbursed by rate payers and shared by shareholders. it allows pg&e to answer questions and educate about their program and how it compares to our program. it requires both parties to work with the california public utilities commission public advisor's office to create a comparison document that would be made able by all parties on the two program offerings. so that gives you some of the key elements. >> and the code of conduct you said is in the process of being ap
was just killed yesterday on biel and market. i'm shocked that this city would really think that this project, on fell street, and oak street, with such a large number of folks who are impacted, should be approved without some kind of an environmental review. i have worked in the environmental review area at various times -- >> president chiu: thank you very much. next speaker. >> my name is -- i live and work in that neighborhood, and i own a business at the corner of oak and divis. i'm also shocked there is no review at all of the impact on the streets and the delivery systems and all the things that are happening in that area. if you even try to block the streets with some cones and test it out for a minute to see what the real impact is, it will probably give us a better picture of what this feels and looks like. i've been delivering in that area for -- since -- at least 15, 18 years. and i drive through that street all the time, day in and day out. and i really feel like a real true study is very important to that area. i'm all for the safety of the bikers and i'm all f
.m. at city hall, we will be celebrating with all of our schools and school communities, teachers, parents, principals, the fact that sfusd is one of only two large urban school systems in the state of california to have surpassed the 800 api mark. [ applause ] so we're tremendously proud of our students and teachers and communities and principals. so we're going to get together and celebrate. and we're going to celebrate that, but we're also going to recognize schools that are on the move, schools that are closing the achievement gap for african-american and latino students and those with growth. so there will be lots of celebrating going on and we're going to recommitment to closing the achievement gap. because, as much as we're going to celebrate, we're also going to be very clear about the fact that we have a long way to go, but that we have the right people on the bus and the bus is heading in the right direction and we're going to add some gas to the bus on thursday. so we want to invite everybody to come and join us. >> can i just one thing? i just want to recognize the district
that there have been a lot of bullying going on and targeting of bullying here in new york city. one of the very early don't shoot that we did was around raising awareness. largely, it was a lot of the racism in the attacks that we were seeing in the wake of 9/11. and that the kids were being targeted, that it was a real affection of what was going on in our culture, that these people no longer felt safe. so it's a big picture. >> host: what i am hearing you say is that this is about creating a school climate that is safe for all kids. but all of the kids and adults in the school, at whatever level they are working are part of the solution. and that you can't just dismiss this as kids will be kids. or that, you know, tough it out. this is really about fundamental dignity. it is about, unfortunately, life and death. and i think that there are far too many young people losing their lives to bullying. due to suicide, suicide has been a wake-up call to all of us. your book and movie have a lot of resources in them. would you like to tell us about your resources that are available on your website? im
to get to ocean much faster. narrator: cities throughout southern california converted natural rivers to these concrete channels, part of their storm drain systems. this allowed expanding development without the need for large flood plains. kharaghani: the los angeles river is approximately 51 miles. concrete reduces the size of the river that you need to carry the water because it speeds up the flow of water. if you'd like to remove all the concrete and to have natural system to carry the water to protect you from flooding, you need to have almost one mile on each side of the river set aside for transport of rain. so in order for the city to have use of those lands around the river, concrete made it possible to have minimum land so the water can be carried to the ocean in the fastest possible way. but, unfortunately, because of population growth and poor housekeeping, people are putting a lot of pollutants on the street and the streets are the openings to our stormwater sewer system. in an average year, 4,000 to 5,000 tons of trash ends up in long beach. man: we've created a system t
in the city of budapest. the attack on hon. jews happen later in the war. effectively, -- the attack on hungarian jews happen later in the war. a large community survive in budapest, a couple hundred thousand, which is a significant number. in poland they survive in all kinds of ways. many survive are going to the soviet union. many came home to find what was left. one very sad and moving archival document said many come home just to see the cemeteries and then leave because they do not want to be there anymore. jews to come back. some try to make new lives there. some joined the communist party. the communist party has an attraction not just for jews, but for anybody who experience the devastation of the war and the shattering of morality the war brought. many people did see in communism a kind of alternatives. maybe this system will work. liberal democracy did not work. the west did not come to our aid. maybe there is some alternative. there was a brief time when people were listening to the radio station, and it was attractive for jews who had nothing else that were excluded from
known, particularly in the city of budapest. the attack on hon. jews happen later in the war. effectively, -- the attack on hungarian jews happen later in the war. a large community survive in budapest, a couple hundred , which is a significant number. in poland they survive in all kinds of ways. many survive are going to the soviet union. many came home to find what was left. one very sad and moving archival document said many come home just to see the cemeteries and then leave because they do not want to be there anymore. jews to come back. some try to make new lives there. some joined the communist party. the communist party has an attraction not just for jews, but for anybody who experience the devastation of the war and the shattering of morality the war brought. many people did see in communism a kind of alternatives. maybe this system will work. liberal democracy did not work. the west did not come to our aid. maybe there is some alternative. there was a brief time when people were listening to the radio station, and it was attractive for jews who had nothing else that
to the bill saying they don't want to approve such large amounts of spending so qukly. around $47 billion of the aid would go to rebuilding damaged areas and helping aid the recovery efforts. the rest would help protect cities against future storms. >>> day eight of our 12 days of giving here on "news4 midday." during these 12 days we're profiling non-profits working to change lives in our area. we invite you to help these great causes. >> keith, it's called boromeo housing. it is a lifeline literally for homeless mothers in washington county around around the washington area. they provide education and housing and critical life skills. you can help this group by calling 202-885-4949. joining me now is darlene bacci and andrea reyes and her little girl. tell us more about this. i understand you're celebrating 25 years. >> yes. this is our 25th anniversary. our mission has not changed in 25 years. we are still an education first, transitional housing program for young single mothers age 16 to 22 and their child. to participate in our program they must be enrolled in school full time, eithe
't belong in the streets of our cities. it doesn't belong where it can be picked up easily by a grievance killer who can walk into a workplace, a mall, a theater, and now an elementary school and kill large numbers. >> ifill: explain to our viewers what you are planning to introduce have changed what happened in newtown connecticut >> well, over time that weapon would be much less available. what we're trying to do is ban the sale, the manufacture, the transfer, the importation of assault weapons. it gets quite technical. i won't go into that right now. grandfather weapons that people already have. subject those weapons either to licensing or to a trigger lock. and spell out those grandfathered weapons which would be over 900 in the bill so nobody can say, oh, we took our... their hunting weapon away. then i'd be able to say here's your hunting weapon. it's specifically exempted in the bill. >> ifill: we're talking about prospective law, not one... >> that's right, that's right. it would ban approximately 100 weapons by actual name. and then weapons by physical characteristics. >> ifill:
festivals' columbus, ohio they used the money to buy an underwater machinery. host: and in the kansas city, they purchased in bomb detection -- a bomb detection robots despite already having two. it sat largely unused and was brought back on line are high schoolers. let's go to our first caller. from the breezy and appeared -- from louisiana. caller: the u.s. territories, do they applied to them guest: they apply to all of federated territories as well. in some areas, there are statutory minimum amounts that have to be provided to those territories. host: if you like to join the conversation and talked to david maurer about a homeland security grants to states, here are the numbers to call. what formula did the grant programs follow went looking to get out the money? what do they have to do? guest: it varies from program to program, but generally speaking, as a first cut, dhs takes into consideration the risk. in other words, it wants to provide the money more toward portions of the country where there is a greater risk of attack or natural disaster. secondly, we look at capabilities. how
over 40 schools in new york city that are destroyed, mostly by the water. roads, bridges, you name it. the devastation is everywhere, it is wide, it is deep. and so with this kind of devastation, even a large area like new york cannot handle it on its own. and fortunately, mr. president, we've had a wisdom here in this government for close to a century, and that is when nature strikes, when the hand of god comes down on earth and creates the kind of damage that man can't comprehend, that no locality can handle it on its own, and so the federal government steps in. which means the country as a whole steps in. and when there were hurricanes in louisiana and mississippi, the whole country stepped in. we said we know this is too much for to you handle alone. when there were forest fires out west, the whole country stepped in saying we know you can't handle this kind of devastation on your own. when there was flooding in the missouri and mississippi valleys, the same. the federal government came in. and we in new york, hundreds of millions, probably over the decades, billions of our tax do
are responding to a natural disaster. host: an image of something purchase by a department in kansas city. bomb detection robot despite already having two. local officials on that one of the broken robot set largely unused four years brought brought it back on line after two high schoolers were asked to repaired which they did for only $5. hines from louisiana. good morning. caller: i have a question, as far as these grants for security threats do you do they apply to united states trust territories like micronesia -- micronesia, close to china, or is it just for the 50 states. guest: a really good question they apply to of the federated territories as well and for some of the grant programs there are statutory minimum amounts that have to be provided for the different territories. join the conversation and talked to david maurer about a homeland security grants to states, here are the numbers to call. what formula did the grant programs follow went looking to get out the money? what do they have to do? guest: it varies from program to program, but generally speaking, as a first cut, dhs takes
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)